Friday, 2 April 2010

Trees, well, the lower half anyway!




Carmi's Thematic Challenge this week is TREES.



These two photos are in fact the same tree in our local park. It has been chopped down by the Council who say it was diseased. This "stump" has been left, they say, to attract wild life.

The roots still look as interesting, however, and remind me of my childhood, when we used to hide things in the little nooks and crannies.

11 comments:

Twain12 said...

it is a beautiful tree, what is left of it anyway

Cloudhands said...

I love the patterns of your old tree roots.
I also played among the roots of gnarly old trees building cities and rooms, whatever the roots inspired in childish imaginations. My cousin and I could spend hours among the roots.

theMuddledMarketPlace said...

i wonder how many of us used to play cities or rooms in tree roots when we were young.............!

kenju said...

There is something about exposed tree roots that call my name too, Gilly.

KathyA said...

I think the thing that is so attractive about tree roots to many of us is the strength of them.

Hollace said...

I always wanted to be the Wendy to Peter Pan's lost boys, and keep house in the roots below a tree. And then I wanted to be Swiss Family Robinson (after the movie came out) and live in their glorious tree house. Still do.

Carol said...

Wow, that is quite something, Nature's artistic side, a great photo for the theme, I enjoyed!

Friko said...

interesting tree, wonderful old roots
I can never resist tree roots; all sorts of stories of hoblins and goblins living amongst them spring to mind.

Sweet Virginia Breeze said...

Nice pictures! I often wonder what stories old trees could tell if they could talk.

Marja said...

Nice pictures I love trees. I often go to the park here where there are many old trees and on our tramp the last few days we hugged an 800 year old tree. Takes a few people to surround him.

Carmi said...

You got the best half in the deal...it's like fingers reaching out to grab the ground. Masterful.

For what it's worth, there are no rules that dictate you have to capture the entire tree. Or the entire anything, for that matter. Indeed, some of my favorite scenes are those where I've "clipped" the composition and only focused on a small part of the larger whole.

Gorgeous.